Truth in fiction

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Grass is Green

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Re: Truth in fiction
« Reply #75 on: January 14, 2018, 02:24:26 PM »
"The move to England and the release from pressures of the business world, and marks a major change in Plover's life. He ingrained himself in the country's fantastic literary scene, trading letters and visits with notable authors such as T.H. White and C.S. Lewis, and is oft-considered a sort of shadow member of the Oxford Inklings. His loose associations with others in the fantastic writing community seem to have encouraged Plover to begin writing his own fantastic stories.

The key influence in Plover's life arrived in the form of the Chatwin family in 1931, who lived in the nearby Darras House. The five children, Martin, Fiona, Rupert, Helen, and Jane, appeared one day at Plover's home. He invited them in for tea, unsure of what to do with the children, but soon warmed to them. They each had vivid imaginations, and often recounted their fantastic stories of adventures to a fantastic world. After one such visit, Plover began to take down notes of their adventures, in a magical land named Fillory. The children soon became regular visitors, recounting their stories to their new friend."

https://io9.gizmodo.com/the-biography-of-christopher-plover-from-lev-grossmans-1617911172

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nrgiseternal

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Re: Truth in fiction
« Reply #76 on: January 14, 2018, 05:48:48 PM »
Some may remember the c.s. lewis defender who posted here sometime ago...  dude was  pedo
If there is any hope, it must lie in the proles..but why the proles, How are they most free to act?