Key#1(and a challenge to those with eyes to see)

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Grass is Green

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Re: Key#1(and a challenge to those with eyes to see)
« Reply #1695 on: February 16, 2018, 01:23:05 PM »
Imagine being aware as an untouchable creative being and we are sharing a dream together that feels real but vaguely incomplete, then you can see it was always complete the whole time and now you remember being your true self.

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DimensionsOfYou

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Re: Key#1(and a challenge to those with eyes to see)
« Reply #1696 on: February 18, 2018, 08:27:21 AM »
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Method_of_loci

The method of loci (loci being Latin for "places") is a method of memory enhancement which uses visualizations with the use of spatial memory, familiar information about one's environment, to quickly and efficiently recall information. The method of loci is also known as the memory journey, memory palace, or mind palace technique. This method is a mnemonic device adopted in ancient Roman and Greek rhetorical treatises (in the anonymous Rhetorica ad Herennium, Cicero's De Oratore, and Quintilian's Institutio Oratoria). Many memory contest champions claim to use this technique to recall faces, digits, and lists of words. These champions' successes have little to do with brain structure or intelligence, but more to do with using spatial memory[1] and the use of the method of loci.

Loci
Loki
Low key
Loakey
Loake
Oak

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Firefly369

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Re: Key#1(and a challenge to those with eyes to see)
« Reply #1697 on: February 18, 2018, 11:32:36 AM »
Oak trees in Celtic times

Celtic Sacred Trees

The oak tree features prominently in many Celtic cultures. The ancient geographer Strabo (1st century AD) reported that the important sacred grove and meeting-place of the Galatian Celts of Asia Minor, Drunemeton, was filled with oaks

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Celtic_sacred_trees
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Cad Goddeu

Cad Goddeu (English: The Battle of the Trees) is a medieval Welsh poem preserved in the 14th-century manuscript known as the Book of Taliesin. The poem refers to a traditional story in which the legendary enchanter Gwydion animates the trees of the forest to fight as his army.

The medieval Welsh poem Cad Goddeu (The Battle of the Trees) is believed to contain Celtic tree lore, possibly relating to the crann ogham, the branch of the ogham alphabet where tree names are used as mnemonic devices.

John Williams used a version of Cad Goddeu (loosely) translated into Sanskrit for his piece "Duel of the Fates" in his score for the film Star Wars: Episode I – The Phantom Menace. He also directly based the second movement of his 2004 Horn Concerto on the "Battle of the Trees."

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cad_Goddeu
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the mention of the oak tree:

The oak, quickly moving,
Before him, tremble heaven and earth.
A valiant door-keeper against an enenly,
his name is considered.

http://www.ancienttexts.org/library/celtic/ctexts/t08.html

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Yggdrasil is an ash tree.
 I looked 😉
Not all who wander are lost....

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Possibles

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Re: Key#1(and a challenge to those with eyes to see)
« Reply #1698 on: February 18, 2018, 02:10:23 PM »
Oak trees in Celtic times

Celtic Sacred Trees

The oak tree features prominently in many Celtic cultures. The ancient geographer Strabo (1st century AD) reported that the important sacred grove and meeting-place of the Galatian Celts of Asia Minor, Drunemeton, was filled with oaks

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Celtic_sacred_trees
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Cad Goddeu

Cad Goddeu (English: The Battle of the Trees) is a medieval Welsh poem preserved in the 14th-century manuscript known as the Book of Taliesin. The poem refers to a traditional story in which the legendary enchanter Gwydion animates the trees of the forest to fight as his army.

The medieval Welsh poem Cad Goddeu (The Battle of the Trees) is believed to contain Celtic tree lore, possibly relating to the crann ogham, the branch of the ogham alphabet where tree names are used as mnemonic devices.

John Williams used a version of Cad Goddeu (loosely) translated into Sanskrit for his piece "Duel of the Fates" in his score for the film Star Wars: Episode I – The Phantom Menace. He also directly based the second movement of his 2004 Horn Concerto on the "Battle of the Trees."

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cad_Goddeu
------
the mention of the oak tree:

The oak, quickly moving,
Before him, tremble heaven and earth.
A valiant door-keeper against an enenly,
his name is considered.

http://www.ancienttexts.org/library/celtic/ctexts/t08.html

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Yggdrasil is an ash tree.
 I looked 😉
There are some Myrtlewood Groves in the Kalmiopsis Wilderness which have escaped commercial explotation. I spent the better part of sixteen years in these areas at one period of my life.
Myrtle is not mentioned in your links, but I like it.
One of my bloodline is involved in building bridges between old Druids and neo Wiccans and I can comfirm her appreciation of Oak. I don't know the lore behind it though, she's on a different path.

There is some sort of battle taking place in the Kalmiopsis, I've seen some very wyrd things.
Grass's 'Airplane That Wasn't There' post didn't surprise me at all.

The Biscuit fire in 2002 burned about 500,000 acres which included the 180,000 acres of the Kalmiopsis. During that fire Air Force One flew over the area fire carrying whatever pretender to the throne. I didn't care to see that bird over my nest.
When I was a child my father worked in and around Columbine 2, the original Air Force One.
I grew up eating from utensils taken from that bird. She was more neutral then.
My dad's walls had several Myrtlewood carvings I sent him over the years, he liked the wood too.