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Im sorry for withholding this...

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K

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I was reading Job in the Bible the other day and ran across this verse:

"I broke the fangs of the wicked
    and snatched the victims from their teeth."- Job 29:17

I shall forever more think of this as a vampire verse.

Then I started wondering if there were MORE verses about vampires.

I googled it and I was very much surprised at all the verses people tie with vampires.

Acts 15:20
Acts 15:28-29
Deuteronomy 18:9-12
Deuteronomy 12:23
1 Chronicles 11:19
Deuteronomy 12:23
Deuteronomy 32:17
Ephesians 6:12
Joel 1:6
Leviticus 7:26-27
Leviticus 17:10-14
Micah 7:2
1 Peter 5:8
Proverbs 30:11-18
Proverbs 30:14
Revelation 9:8
Revelation 16:6
Revelation 17:6

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Some of these verses might be pushing it IMO.  Others, I can see how they could be speaking of vampires.


Sunday School would have been a lot more exciting if we knew vampires were in the Bible!  The scariest thing we had stories about were lions, a whale, and a giant.  But vampires!  Church would have become a lot more interesting!

Wasn't Judas the first vampire, or am I confusing that with another thing?

I like the verse from Job you mentioned but it would not fit the time frame, but I think it could also reference cannibalism.

Firefly369

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This video talks about the symbolism of the bat, and how it relates to Egyptian cosmology

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great video!!


From this video:

God of the Milky Way was a horned cow goddess named Bat

"Her name was derived from the word Ba, which was the element of the human soul that was temporarily submerged in darkness and suffering which the ancients often referred to as "The Dark Night of the Soul."  The Ba qas submerged in the dark night of the soul because it had fallen from Heaven, down to Earth through the Celestial Silver Gate.  To re-enter Heaven, the Ba had to travel back to Heaven through the celestial Golden Gate. 

The goddess of the Milky Way was named Bat, because bat is the feminine form of Ba.  If we had the word "Man" to Bat, we neutralize the feminine T and form a new androgynous title for the Ba - Batman.

In this way, we see that "Ba" and "Batman" are the same word.

Firefly369

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Legends and myths of the blood drinking dead go back millennia, but search in vain for any hint that sunlight will do them any harm at all. Not the lamia, the lilitu, the weng chiang, upir, vyrvolokas or langsuir–not one vampire in folklore suffers from this weakness.


Lilitu

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I was rereading through this thread and was rereading through the links that were posted.

This seems to connect a few things.


But finally writing would develop, and over 4,000 years ago, as texts attest: belief in demonic beings that, at the least, consumed blood, were prevalent in Mesopotamia and Northern Africa.

By the time of ancient Babylon, over 4,000 years ago, the spirit was clearly believed to survive the physical body. Rituals and amulets were created to prevent these supernatural beings from molesting the living. And at about the same time, in the deserts and wastelands of Sumer, demons named Lilîtu and Dimme were believed to prowl the night, in search of victims to drain of blood and life force.

Dimme, who would later also be known as Lamashtu, was believed to be a rogue daughter of the Mesopotamian sky god Anu. She appears as early as the early second millennium B.C.E., in ritual incantations written in Sumerian and Akkadian.

Meanwhile, in ancient Egypt, a demonic winged being called baa – based on the verb for “drinking blood” – is mentioned in a 3,800-year-old ancient magico-medical papyrus text called Ramesseum III found in Thebes. 

Certainly by the time ancient Egyptian religion took shape, belief in beings who consume blood was commonplace, says Dr. Kaisa Szpakowska, associate professor in ancient history and Egyptology at Swansea University, UK. Similar creatures are mentioned in the New Kingdom's funerary text of Amduat and in ("Text of the Hidden Chamber Which is in the Underworld") as well as in the Book of the Dead 125B, which both date to approximately 1,500 B.C.E. The Book of the Dead references the "Lady of raging, she who dances on blood", who is propitiated through ceremony.

In another seminal Egyptian story, “The Destruction of Mankind,” the humans are pitted against Ra, the sun god, who sends the goddess Hathor to wipe them out. The instant blood touches her lips, Hathor is transformed into the vicious Sekhmet, who slaughters so many that she wades in blood up to her knees.

While in the ancient world, blood represented life and power, the Mesopotamian "vampires" were not seeking souls but sustenance. Also, as microorganisms were unknown, disease was usually thought to have a demonic origin, hence the need for amulets to heal the sick. 

The Mesopotamian spirit Lilîtu, whose name is actually derived from the Sumerian word líl meaning wind, spirit, is part of a triad of winged evil demons with human-like upper bodies, the legs of a wolf or a lion and taloned feet that belong to the spirit-class," says Gordin. The other two were her male counterpart lilû and the 'maiden' Lilu', he says.

The earliest known record of Lilitu is found in the Sumerian epic poem of Gilgamesh, under her Sumerian name Ki.sikil.lil.la (“Dark Maiden”).

The legend of Gilgamesh, which was written about 4,000 years ago, was found on a clay tablet in 1853 by archaeologists excavating in Ur. The hero Gilgamesh overcomes a number of obstacles in his quest for immortal life. In one escapade he encounters the demoness Lilitu, who tries to thwart his plans to declare his love to Inanna, the goddess of eroticism and war. Equipped with a steady sword and sturdy armor, he not only kills a monster but also forces a terrified Lilitu to flee to the desert.


Firefly369

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Wasn't Judas the first vampire, or am I confusing that with another thing?

I like the verse from Job you mentioned but it would not fit the time frame, but I think it could also reference cannibalism.

Judas wasn't the first 🙂

And it could be related to cannibalism too, you are right. 

Firefly369

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Wasn't Judas the first vampire, or am I confusing that with another thing?

I like the verse from Job you mentioned but it would not fit the time frame, but I think it could also reference cannibalism.

Judas wasn't the first 🙂

And it could be related to cannibalism too, you are right.


Reread this post and link :)


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“Under Cain’s alternative titles of “Masda” and “Mazdao,” Gardner writes that Cain was celebrated as the ancestral forbearer of the Magian spiritual master Zarathrustra, the predecessor of Ham. This was reflected in the variant of Ahura- Mazda , the followers of Asar (Osiris) and Horus of Egypt that later spawned the cult of Ormuz or Ormus that became the Alexandrian organization known as the sages of light, which, in turn, formed the basis for the Essene/Priory of Sion Order of the Red Cross and the Templars.
[...]
“Masda translated from ancient Sumerian as “one that prostrates himself as a serpent.” Additionally, Cain/Masda, the son of Adama, retained as his Sumerian appellation Ar- Wi- Um , which was closely related to the Hebrew word awim , or “serpent.” Qayin/Cain was listed in the Kings of Kish list with the title Ar- iwi- um, for he was the first worshipper of the dark seraphim angels, the first Masda, all to spite the true God. This implies that Cain was a king sponsored by seraphim angels, while his dynastic kingship popularized its ancestral heritage with serpent and Dragon allegories of royalty that have survived to this day. All things continually lead back to serpents, dragons, fairies, Nephilim, and fallen angels.
[...]
“Adding to this, the Persian tradition of Enki/Samael was called Ohrmazd , meaning “serpent of the night.” Ohrmazd was another name for the high god of Zarathustra, the Persian god Ahura Mazda, the high god of Ham and Cain, from whence they adopted their cultic titles, again linking everything. This additionally identifies Zoroastrianism as an antediluvian religion, likely a branch of Enochian mysticism and Atlantean mysticism transplanted into the postdiluvian epoch by Indo- European Aryans, the Scythians and surviving Titans.

Firefly369

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Books about vampirism

Quote
Short popular writings on real vampirism have been so sparse that I am able to give here a near complete history. As more general works go, beneficial is Hoyt’s (1984) Lust For Blood: The Consuming Story of Vampires, which, although focused on the history of supernatural vampires from ancient mythological accounts to twentieth-century accounts in both America and Europe, provides a sampling of modern-day accounts about American vampire “practitioners” and surveys briefly the more famous cases of blood-drinking serial killings. Melton’s (1999) The Vampire Book: The Encyclopedia of the Undead is an invaluable first source, defining in minute detail major as well as minor terms that treat the various aspects of the vampire phenomena. Finally, Ramsland’s (2002) The Science of Vampires offers interviews with vampire “practitioners”, forensic experts and various specialists whose works and personal accounts explore the myths and modern-day realities of vampirism.

These next works are among the earliest to examine real vampirism more directly and served as the basis for much subsequent research. A canonical work in the field, Kaplan’s (1984) Vampires Are is a compilation of Kaplan’s findings on “real vampires” before a community existed. Also, Kaplan’s Vampire Research Center was the first of its kind and would provide a model for future research centres and institutions. Dresser’s (1989) American Vampires: Fans, Victims, and Practitioners examines various aspects of the vampire culture in America, from people who experience sexual gratification through blood-letting rituals and consumption, to lifestylers (or people who adopt the visual trappings of vampires), to fans merely obsessed with vampire media. Guiley’s (1991) Vampires Among Us uses a more personal approach to present stories about people who identify themselves as vampires, while also considering the folkloric history of vampires and its influence on the modern-day real vampire scene. Page’s (1993) Bloodlust: Conversations with Real Vampires, one of the first studies of its kind and now regarded as a seminal work in the field, offers interviews with and a detailed look at people who self-identify as vampire while discussing the various aspects of their day-to-lives. Skal’s (1993) The Monster Show: A Cultural History of Horror explores in one of its chapters the conflation between blood contamination and vampirism during the Regan years and even provides an interview between the author and a modern-day real vampire. In Ramsland’s (1999) Piercing the Darkness: Undercover with Vampires in America Today, she uses the story of Susan Walsh, who disappeared while investigating vampire cults in 1996, to frame her own investigation into vampiric blood-letting, sexuality and body modification. And lastly, Youngson’s (1997) Private Files of a Vampirologist: Case Histories & Letters examines 11 case studies and 14 personal letters addressed to Youngson by people who self-identify as vampire.

Among the most recent studies (many by actual vampire writers) to begin exploring the vampire community as we understand it today is Guinn’s (1997) Something in the Blood: The Underground World of Today’s Vampires, which provides an introduction to the vampire subculture using interviews not only with people who identify themselves as vampires but people who have unwillingly fallen victim to so-called predatory vampires. Konstantinos’s (2003) Vampires: The Occult Truth explores the occult truths behind vampires using first-person accounts that treat of not only the vampires of folklore but also modern-day psychic and sanguinarian vampires. Nocturnum and Filipak’s (2009) Allure of the Vampire: Our Sexual Attraction to the Undead examines in detail culture’s attraction to vampires by tracing their history in folklore, books and film, from ancient mythology to the modern-day vampire community. Russo’s (2008) Vampire Nation dispels the centuries-old myths and rumours behind vampirism, provides accounts of actual vampirism and real-life narratives, and interviews modern-day vampires who reveal their feeding rituals and behavioural practices.

Works by Belanger, who self-identifies as a psychic vampire, have become some of the most important and respected in the field. Her The Psychic Vampire Codex: A Manual of Magick and Energy Work (2004) is now considered a canonical work in the field. It examines the history and everyday reality of the real vampire community, its cultural practices and esoteric language, from mere lifestylers to the difference between “psychic” and “sanguinarian” vampires, again the community’s two main divisions. Belanger’s (2005) Sacred Hunger compiles her major essays on the topics of vampirism, Bram Stoker, Dracula, modern-day psychic and sanguinarian vampires, and the history and development of the real vampire subculture. Finally, Belanger’s (2007) Vampires in Their Own Words: An Anthology of Vampire Voices, for which she serves as editor, compiles various essays and personal narratives predominantly by and concerning people who identify themselves as vampires, as well as, to a lesser degree, wiccans and various other lifestylers who write on vampirism and various facets of the vampire subculture and lifestyle. By far the most valuable study on the modern-day vampire community, Laycock’s (2009) Vampires Today: The Truth about Modern Vampirism explores representations of vampirism using extensive interviews predominantly with members of the AVA as well as a few other vampire communities throughout the United States. This work examines not only real vampires, who, as I have said, report feeling a natural attraction towards blood and energy consumption, but lifestylers as well who have adopted the Gothic aesthetic that has come to be associated with the vampires of media. Laycock’s book, which has proven to be indispensable in understanding the real vampire community, its infrastructure and its organizational history, now serves as a canonical study in the field. There is also a small body of (problematic) socio-religious writings on the real vampire identity that Laycock (2010) outlines in his more recent work. Finally, Williams (2008, 2009, 2013), and Browning (2010a, 2010b, 2011), treat of the creative, therapeutic, self-liberating and antinormative nature of real vampirism.

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Firefly369

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"Those who know about vampires say there are two sorts, one sort always attacks its own relations... and the other always selects the most charming young girls.”
The author of Varney, *splitting* as Michael Bell calls it.

Why are most of our movies only of the second sort?
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Varney the Vampire; Or, the Feast of Blood by Prest and Rymer
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A small pane of glass is broken, and the form from without introduces a long gaunt hand, which seems utterly destitute of flesh. The fastening is removed, and one-half of the window, which opens like folding doors, is swung wide open upon its hinges.


And yet now she could not scream—she could not move. "Help!—help!—help!" was all she could say. But, oh, that look of terror that sat upon her face, it was dreadful—a look to haunt the memory for a lifetime—a look to obtrude itself upon the happiest moments, and turn them to bitterness.


The figure turns half round, and the light falls upon the face. It is perfectly white—perfectly bloodless. The eyes look like polished tin; the lips are drawn back, and the principal feature next to those dreadful eyes is the teeth—the fearful looking teeth—projecting like those of some wild animal, hideously, glaringly white, and fang-like. It approaches the bed with a strange, gliding movement. It clashes together the long nails that literally appear to hang from the finger ends. No sound comes from its lips. Is she going mad—that young and beautiful girl exposed to so much terror? she has drawn up all her limbs; she cannot even now say help. The power of articulation is gone, but the power of movement has returned to her; she can draw herself slowly along to the other side of the bed from that towards which the hideous appearance is coming.
 
But her eyes are fascinated. The glance of a serpent could not have produced a greater effect upon her than did the fixed gaze of those awful, metallic-looking eyes that were bent on her face. Crouching down so that the gigantic height was lost, and the horrible, protruding, white face was the most prominent object, came on the figure. What was it?—what did it want there?—what made it look so hideous—so unlike an inhabitant of the earth, and yet to be on it?
p.9

 

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