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Author Topic: Random musings

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Re: Random musings
#375: August 01, 2020, 08:54:04 PM
Fun fact the ocular cavity when being referenced in the singular is called the orbit
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Re: Random musings
#376: August 02, 2020, 02:12:57 PM
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Fun fact the ocular cavity when being referenced in the singular is called the orbit

So the eye sits in the orbit. What else is an orbit? Here is an image of the orbit of different planets as seen from Earth.



Its very interesting seeing how many things in 'outer space', when their etymology is viewed, is either referring to parts of the body or music. Could the 'human body' actually contain the 'entire universe' inside of it? Could our bodies be unique microcosms of the entire universe itself?

There is a reason why Creator gifted man the spark that (apparently) no other race of beings has.

Look at some of the artwork that the band 'Tool' uses. They actually resemble the orbits of planets (gods) as seen from Earth. If I had to pick just one that it resembled the most, it would be Saturn's.



Each socket/orbit has an eye inside of it. This would mean that there are many 'eyes' always viewing what is going on inside the planet(s) and god(s) they surround. If Saturn is the one with the most control that sits on top and contains all other planets, gods and densities, then it would seem to imply that Saturn 'perceives all'.

Now, if we were to relate this to the human body and what we can do, then it would imply that our eyes are able and do perceive countless realities that exist right next to and on top of each other. Yet, most people decide to limit themselves to only 'this' Earthly reality.


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Random musings
#377: August 02, 2020, 10:45:09 PM
I've noticed talk show hosts always seem to dislike magicians.
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Random musings
#378: August 05, 2020, 12:53:22 AM
In Robert Sepehr's latest video about ancient greece he talks about the myths surrounding Jupiter/Zeus, and one particular part struck out. And I'm trying to figure some things out so did some digging. 

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I. How Fire Was Given to Men
In those old, old times, there lived two brothers who were not like other men, nor yet like those Mighty Ones who lived upon the mountain top. They were the sons of one of those Titans who had fought against Jupiter and been sent in chains to the strong prison-house of the Lower World.

The name of the elder of these brothers was Prometheus, or Forethought; for he was always thinking of the future and making things ready for what might happen to-morrow, or next week, or next year, or it may be in a hundred years to come. The younger was called Epimetheus, or Afterthought; for he was always so busy thinking of yesterday, or last year, or a hundred years ago, that he had no care at all for what might come to pass after a while.

For some cause Jupiter had not sent these brothers to prison with the rest of the Titans.

Prometheus did not care to live amid the clouds on the mountain top. He was too busy for that. While the Mighty Folk were spending their time in idleness, drinking nectar and eating ambrosia, he was intent upon plans for making the world wiser and better than it had ever been before.

He went out amongst men to live with them and help them; for his heart was filled with sadness when he found that they were no longer happy as they had been during the golden days when Saturn was king. Ah, how very poor and wretched they were! He found them living in caves and in holes of the earth, shivering with the cold because there was no fire, dying of starvation, hunted by wild beasts and by one another–the most miserable of all living creatures.

“If they only had fire,” said Prometheus to himself, “they could at least warm themselves and cook their food; and after a while they could learn to make tools and build themselves houses. Without fire, they are worse off than the beasts.”

Then he went boldly to Jupiter and begged him to give fire to men, that so they might have a little comfort through the long, dreary months of winter.

“Not a spark will I give,” said Jupiter. “No, indeed! Why, if men had fire they might become strong and wise like ourselves, and after a while they would drive us out of our kingdom. Let them shiver with cold, and let them live like the beasts. It is best for them to be poor and ignorant, that so we Mighty Ones may thrive and be happy.”

Prometheus made no answer; but he had set his heart on helping mankind, and he did not give up. He turned away, and left Jupiter and his mighty company forever.

As he was walking by the shore of the sea he found a reed, or, as some say, a tall stalk of fennel, growing; and when he had broken it off he saw that its hollow center was filled with a dry, soft pith which would burn slowly and keep on fire a long time. He took the long stalk in his hands, and started with it towards the dwelling of the sun in the far east.

“Mankind shall have fire in spite of the tyrant who sits on the mountain top,” he said.

He reached the place of the sun in the early morning just as the glowing, golden orb was rising from the earth and beginning his daily journey through the sky. He touched the end of the long reed to the flames, and the dry pith caught on fire and burned slowly. Then he turned and hastened back to his own land, carrying with him the precious spark hidden in the hollow center of the plant.

He called some of the shivering men from their caves and built a fire for them, and showed them how to warm themselves by it and how to build other fires from the coals. Soon there was a cheerful blaze in every rude home in the land, and men and women gathered round it and were warm and happy, and thankful to Prometheus for the wonderful gift which he had brought to them from the sun.

It was not long until they learned to cook their food and so to eat like men instead of like beasts. They began at once to leave off their wild and savage habits; and instead of lurking in the dark places of the world, they came out into the open air and the bright sunlight, and were glad because life had been given to them.

After that, Prometheus taught them, little by little, a thousand things. He showed them how to build houses of wood and stone, and how to tame sheep and cattle and make them useful, and how to plow and sow and reap, and how to protect themselves from the storms of winter and the beasts of the woods. Then he showed them how to dig in the earth for copper and iron, and how to melt the ore, and how to hammer it into shape and fashion from it the tools and weapons which they needed in peace and war; and when he saw how happy the world was becoming he cried out:

“A new Golden Age shall come, brighter and better by far than the old!”

Jupiter is pissed and enacts retribution for disobeying him:

Quote
In those very early times there was a man named Deucalion, and he was the son of Prometheus. He was only a common man and not a Titan like his great father, and yet he was known far and wide for his good deeds and the uprightness of his life. His wife’s name was Pyrrha, and she was one of the fairest of the daughters of men.

After Jupiter had bound Prometheus on Mount Caucasus and had sent diseases and cares into the world, men became very, very wicked. They no longer built houses and tended their flocks and lived together in peace; but every man was at war with his neighbor, and there was no law nor safety in all the land. Things were in much worse case now than they had been before Prometheus had come among men, and that was just what Jupiter wanted. But as the world became wickeder and wickeder every day, he began to grow weary of seeing so much bloodshed and of hearing the cries of the oppressed and the poor.

Another interesting thing in the video, based on the story of Zeus' unleashing the flood waters (and instructing someone to create an ark) it closely mirrors the story of Noah - another indication that Zeus/Jupiter/Lucifer is the god of the Bible. 

  • So the question is, is Prometheus an aspect of Lucifer/Zeus/Jupiter?
  • Why would Zeus punish this part of himself?
  • Also, I have a friend who is obsessed with the idea that fire (specifically cooking food) led to one of the falls of man, is this the case? Either directly, or through the "punishments" unleashed by Zeus?
  • What is the difference between the titans and the gods? Considering the origins of the titans are the greek/roman gods mostly just aspects of the ego -
     their children and children's children?
  • It's been mentioned before that studying the myths is one of the first steps to this journey, anyone have any good suggestions for greek/roman stories/myths? Similarly for egypt? I've read a couple collections for both, but they seem to only skim the surface and are more surface level. Looking for book recommendations.
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Re: Random musings
#379: August 05, 2020, 02:28:04 AM
I enjoy these because they go beyond Bullfinch or Hamilton, they do much more than retell the myths for story’s sake.

Robert Graves’ The Greek Myths volumes, preferably older printings with his extensive footnotes in tact. The White Goddess with footnotes is a poetic investigation exploring Hellenic archetypes and etymologies beyond ancient Greece.

Joseph Campbell’s Occidental Mythology does the same in simpler terms and links Hellenism to the “one story” he’s renowned for carrying into modern literature.

Anne Baring and Jules Crawford’s The Myth of the Goddess investigates Venus through the ages, up to Mary and Sophia and Cinderella. It’s not as poetic as the others (ie it’s too modern!) but it gives many references and a large Bibliography.

From Ritual to Romance by Jessie Weston is a short, compelling read. Like Campbell’s Mythos lectures her work proves the Greek mysteries survived well into medieval myth.
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Re: Random musings
#380: August 05, 2020, 02:33:02 AM
Awesome thank you.
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Re: Random musings
#381: August 05, 2020, 02:51:34 AM
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    Awesome thank you.

    Anytime!!

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    • So the question is, is Prometheus an aspect of Lucifer/Zeus/Jupiter?
    • Why would Zeus punish this part of himself?

    In line with what Nick has said of the tutelary deity as Venus, it’s possible that Prometheus is a male casting of Venus. The Vedic Venus is Shukra, a “preceptor” renowned with foresight, prophecy, and the mystery of rebirth. Like Prometheus, Shukra spites Jupiter to share knowledge with the Asuras or earthly spirits.[/list]
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    Re: Random musings
    #382: August 05, 2020, 05:36:39 AM
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      Awesome thank you.

      Anytime!!

      You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
      • So the question is, is Prometheus an aspect of Lucifer/Zeus/Jupiter?
      • Why would Zeus punish this part of himself?

      In line with what Nick has said of the tutelary deity as Venus, it’s possible that Prometheus is a male casting of Venus. The Vedic Venus is Shukra, a “preceptor” renowned with foresight, prophecy, and the mystery of rebirth. Like Prometheus, Shukra spites Jupiter to share knowledge with the Asuras or earthly spirits.[/list]

      The Greeks were fairly obsessed with Lucifer they had him as  Prometheus chiron and Apollo and lesser  aspects in a few others
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      Re: Random musings
      #383: August 05, 2020, 09:51:53 PM
      Is the dog star related to the "dogs of war" idea - or the fact that marine's and other soldiers are referred to as dogs?
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      Re: Random musings
      #384: August 05, 2020, 11:59:37 PM
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      Is the dog star related to the "dogs of war" idea - or the fact that marine's and other soldiers are referred to as dogs?

      I think it's mostly related to the concept of "Dog Days". But also, the word "Dog" itself is "God" reversed.

      dog (n.)
      "quadruped of the genus Canis," Old English docga, a late, rare word, used in at least one Middle English source in reference specifically to a powerful breed of canine; other early Middle English uses tend to be depreciatory or abusive. Its origin remains one of the great mysteries of English etymology

      Quote
      The dog days or dog days of summer are the hot, sultry days of summer. They were historically the period following the heliacal rising of the star system Sirius, which Hellenistic astrology connected with heat, drought, sudden thunderstorms, lethargy, fever, mad dogs, and bad luck. They are now taken to be the hottest, most uncomfortable part of summer in the Northern Hemisphere.
      The English name is a calque of the Latin dies caniculares (lit. "the puppy days"), itself a calque of the ancient Greek κυνάδες ἡμέραι.[1] The Greeks knew the star α Canis Majoris by several names, including Sirius "Scorcher" (Σείριος, Seírios), Sothis (Σῶθις, Sôthis, a transcription of Egyptian Spdt), and the Dog Star (Κῠ́ων, Kúōn).[2] The last name reflects the way Sirius follows the constellation Orion into the night sky

      Quote
      The dog is tied to the Moon by inheritance of blood: the domestic dog carries within it the lunar forces of the ancient wolf ancestor. According to shamanic tradition, the wolf howls at the moon to thank it for illuminating the night. The wolf sees through the dark, finds the way thanks to the light reflected from the Moon (female planet) to penetrate into the woods where hunting in a pack. His progress through the night, which is also based on smell, also allows him to be a totemic animal, or an animal on which it is possible to meditate to find the way into the darkness within ourselves, or the unconscious. Despite this (or perhaps by inversion) the dog is a predominantly diurnal animal, having adapted to the life of man: in this way its symbolic values ​​move more and more towards solar characteristics.

      The negative side of the symbolism of the wolf (and therefore of the dog) is that of its demonization in instinctive power totally out of control, so much so that the human being regresses to a semi-human state: this is the process that intervenes in the legendary figure of the werewolf. A werewolf is a human being who gets rid of an overly heavy civilized and moralistic super-ego to give vent to the darkest instincts. Feran and feral sensuality are mixed in the werewolf, which invade and eclipse the compassion and love of the human being. The silver bullet, fatal to the wolf man of subsequent fictional narratives, is obviously linked to the Moon: silver, as a lunar metal, can welcome the forces of the Christ of the Sun through blessing, thus reversing the perverse lunarity of the wolf werewolf
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      Cerberus (Kerberos) is a triple-headed dog or doglike creature who guards the entrance to Hades, the Greek underworld. Not originally a “Demonic” creature, Cerberus became the model for the Hellhounds of the Devil and other Black Dogs in folklore. In classical myth, Cerberus is the offspring of Typhon, a dragon and Serpent-shaped monster associated with wind and volcanic eruptions. In Homeric poems, Cerberus is “the dog.”
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      So while God awaits in "Heaven", the symbolic representation of Hell, or the underworld, "Hades" is guarded by a Dog. Anubis is the Egyptian God of death and the underworld and is depicted with a Dog's head.

      This is also why a bad life is often called a "dog’s life". The word  dog is also used to refer to a wicked, unpleasant person
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      Re: Random musings
      #385: August 06, 2020, 12:01:58 AM
      black people also call each other dogs, or "dawgs".
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      Re: Random musings
      #386: August 06, 2020, 12:59:20 AM
      St christoper, im sirius
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      Random musings
      #387: August 06, 2020, 07:47:32 AM
      “PHILOSOPHER: Without question, there is no shortage of behavior that is evil. But no one, not even the most hardened criminal, becomes involved in crime purely out of a desire to engage in evil acts. Every criminal has an internal justification for getting involved in crime. A dispute over money leads someone to engage in murder, for instance. To the perpetrator, it is something for which there is a justification and which can be restated as an accomplishment of “good.” Of course, this is not good in a moral sense, but good in the sense of being “of benefit to oneself.”
      YOUTH: Of benefit to oneself?
      PHILOSOPHER: The Greek word for “good” (agathon) does not have a moral meaning. It just means “beneficial.” Conversely, the word for “evil” (kakon) means “not beneficial.” Our world is rife with injustices and misdeeds of all kinds, yet there is not one person who desires evil in the purest sense of the word, that is to say something “not beneficial.”

      Excerpt From: Ichiro Kishimi. “The Courage to Be Disliked.” iBooks.
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      Re: Random musings
      #388: August 06, 2020, 02:47:56 PM
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      St christoper, im sirius

      In front of everyone's faces:

      "This saint, portrayed in the Eastern church as a man with the head of a dog, was supposedly descended from a legendary race of giants with human bodies and canine heads." You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
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      Re: Random musings
      #389: August 06, 2020, 05:06:43 PM
      What does it mean though? Christopher was a follower of the sirius cult? He was a burly, animalistic man, or an actual dog human hybrid. I've read a lot of various info on christopher/dog headed deities, but struggling with this one.
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