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Stories Continued

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Iamme

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“She recreated the mountains not as she had originally seen them but as she eventually chose to perceive them, not only a capacity to observe the world but a capacity to alter his or her observation of it---which, in the end, is the capacity to alter the world, itself." Tom Robbins

Nrgiseternal

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C.g. saw what goes on in elite circles and obsessively pursued the truth

Penia_Phronesis

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C.g. saw what goes on in elite circles and obsessively pursued the truth

I'm sure its been seen, but its worth mentioning.

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Iamme

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Mediaeval Mythbusting Blog #2: The Problem of “Witchmarks”



Some interesting parts:

"The phrase “witchmarks” is a releatively recent invention. Graffiti archaeologist, Matthew Champion, demonstrated at this year’s Vernacular Architecture Group winter conference that it may not be any older than the middle of the last decade and was specifically invented by journalists to act as an emotive word for use in attention-grabbing headlines."

"The inaccurate term refers to a loosely associated group of marks which are found in historic buildings which include M’s and double-V’s, pentagrams, knotwork, meshes, circular designs and burn marks. "

"Research by an increasing number of scholars, archaeologists and writers (sometimes all three in one!) has largely concluded that these marks were deliberately created by people across a wide period of time spanning the mediaeval, early modern and modern eras and that they may relate to the practice of averting evil or bad luck whilst also bringing good luck to the occupants of buildings (as well as other locations including trees and caves)."

It's a good time for extra protection.
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“She recreated the mountains not as she had originally seen them but as she eventually chose to perceive them, not only a capacity to observe the world but a capacity to alter his or her observation of it---which, in the end, is the capacity to alter the world, itself." Tom Robbins

Iamme

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I play with candles
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“She recreated the mountains not as she had originally seen them but as she eventually chose to perceive them, not only a capacity to observe the world but a capacity to alter his or her observation of it---which, in the end, is the capacity to alter the world, itself." Tom Robbins

Hax

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I've been lurking about but didn't really have anything to say. You said the same thing about blue and orange before. May I ask what the personal significance is?

Blue and orange oppose each other on the color wheel, FWIW.

Jbird

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I've been lurking about but didn't really have anything to say. You said the same thing about blue and orange before. May I ask what the personal significance is?

Blue and orange oppose each other on the color wheel, FWIW.

My two favorite colors.

Iamme

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I haven't listened to this whole thing yet but am enjoying it
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“She recreated the mountains not as she had originally seen them but as she eventually chose to perceive them, not only a capacity to observe the world but a capacity to alter his or her observation of it---which, in the end, is the capacity to alter the world, itself." Tom Robbins

Iamme

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I haven't listened to this whole thing yet but am enjoying it
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The Key of David discussion here is good.
“She recreated the mountains not as she had originally seen them but as she eventually chose to perceive them, not only a capacity to observe the world but a capacity to alter his or her observation of it---which, in the end, is the capacity to alter the world, itself." Tom Robbins

Iamme

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The Tibetan Book Of Living and Dying by Sogyal Rinpoche

"According to the wisdom of Buddha, we can actually use our lives to prepare for death. We do not have to wait for the painful death of someone close to us or the shock of terminal illness to force us to look at our lives. Nor are we condemned to go out empty-handed at death to meet the unknown. We can begin, here and now, to find meaning in our lives. We can make of every moment an opportunity to change and to prepare—wholeheartedly, precisely, and with peace of mind—for death and eternity.


“In the Buddhist approach, life and death are seen as one whole, where death is the beginning of another chapter of life. Death is the mirror in which the entire meaning of life is reflected.

"In this wonderful teaching, we find the whole of life and death presented together as a series of constantly changing transitional realities known as bardos. The word "bardo" is commonly used to denote the intermediate state between death and rebirth, but in reality bardos are occuring continuously throughout both life and death, and are junctures when the possibility of liberation, or enlightenment, is heightened.

The bardos are particularly powerful opportunities for liberation because there are, the teachings show us, certain moments that are much more powerful than others and much more charged with potential, when whatever you do has a crucial and far-reachig effect...The greatest and most charged of these moments, however, is the moment of death."
Last Edit: August 19, 2021, 02:35:00 PM by Iamme
“She recreated the mountains not as she had originally seen them but as she eventually chose to perceive them, not only a capacity to observe the world but a capacity to alter his or her observation of it---which, in the end, is the capacity to alter the world, itself." Tom Robbins

Penia_Phronesis

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The Tibetan Book Of Living and Dying by Sogyal Rinpoche

"According to the wisdom of Buddha, we can actually use our lives to prepare for death. We do not have to wait for the painful death of someone close to us or the shock of terminal illness to force us to look at our lives. Nor are we condemned to go out empty-handed at death to meet the unknown. We can begin, here and now, to find meaning in our lives. We can make of every moment an opportunity to change and to prepare—wholeheartedly, precisely, and with peace of mind—for death and eternity.


“In the Buddhist approach, life and death are seen as one whole, where death is the beginning of another chapter of life. Death is the mirror in which the entire meaning of life is reflected.

"In this wonderful teaching, we find the whole of life and death presented together as a series of constantly changing transitional realities known as bardos. The word "bardo" is commonly used to denote the intermediate state between death and rebirth, but in reality bardos are occuring continuously throughout both life and death, and are junctures when the possibility of liberation, or enlightenment, is heightened.

The bardos are particularly powerful opportunities for liberation because there are, the teachings show us, certain moments that are much more powerful than others and much more charged with potential, when whatever you do has a crucial and far-reachig effect...The greatest and most charged of these moments, however, is the moment of death."

Has anyone seen Enter the Void (2009)? It tackles some of the books ideas through film. Thought it was worth mentioning.
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Iamme

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You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login - Thanks for the recommend. I'll check it out. So far I'm gaining a lot from the book. To be clear it's a new take (an expansion) on the Tibetan Book of the Dead.
“She recreated the mountains not as she had originally seen them but as she eventually chose to perceive them, not only a capacity to observe the world but a capacity to alter his or her observation of it---which, in the end, is the capacity to alter the world, itself." Tom Robbins

Penia_Phronesis

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You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login - Thanks for the recommend. I'll check it out. So far I'm gaining a lot from the book. To be clear it's a new take (an expansion) on the Tibetan Book of the Dead.

Nice, no problem. Enter the Void is a personal favorite. I'll have to give that a read through.
They want power. We want respect.

 

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