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This deserves more discussion
#210: November 24, 2020, 04:41:48 PM


Found this today with no context. Someone said (on twitter) it's the giant from kandahar afghanistan.
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This deserves more discussion
#211: April 25, 2021, 02:35:34 PM
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Quote
   “… because there is a type of [red-haired] sorcerer in [Romanian] folklore called a ‘Solomonar,’ and it does fit [Emily] Gerard’s description [of the folklore behind Dracula’s alma mater]—[underground] school, devil, dragon and all. And even though there doesn’t seem to be much information about the school itself out there, we’ve got plenty about the Solomonarie who supposedly attended it. Probably the most relevant piece of information we have is the suggestion that they’re undead. [Romanian loremaster Simion Florea] Marian paints the Solomonarie as Strigoi, a kind of craven, evil, extremely malicious zombie. Essentially a Romanian proto-vampire with all the same abilities and weaknesses we’re used to—the bloodsucking, the transformation, the aversion to garlic and holy symbols and sunlight, the super strength, the stake to the heart—but without all the sexy, shiny Victorian-ness of our modern concept.
   Even so, Strigoi or not, you might not actually even realize it if you ran into a Solomonar. They blend in almost perfectly with the locals, taller than most maybe, with a mane of red hair. But they wear the same clothes as the peasantry and go around begging for alms. Not exactly typical vampire behavior. This is how they keep an eye on the populace—see whose land deserves the attention of the [underground] school’s weather maker. Some versions of the legend even suggest that any Solomonar can mount the dragon and guide the storms, and that if you can just find one of them, you can pay them to bring bad weather to your enemies. You can even hire a counter-Solomonar pre-emptively to keep someone from doing this to you. In a pinch, if you really need to identify one of them, take a look in their bag. They’ll be carrying around a Birch bark saddle, a branch that was used to kill a snake, and most telling of all, a Solomonar’s book: the place where they record all the spells and charms they learned during their time in the school.
   So we have a bunch of vagrant, red-haired vampire-wizards wandering around making a show of begging in order to figure out who deserves a thunderstorm, so that their dragon-riding friend can bring it to them. Maybe not the image Stoker had in mind for Dracula, but that’s okay, good even. It can be our image, a fresh take full of new material. This could be a Dracula, or a point in Dracula’s story, that few people have ever even thought to spend time on. And this, mind you, is before we even discuss the Dragon!
   Marian distinguishes it from all the many different breeds of Slavic dragon in the region, suggesting it is specifically a Romanian Balaur (which honestly hardly narrows things down.) Yes, there are some shared qualities between Balauri: they often have golden scales, almost always have between three and twelve heads, and they maintain the typical fairytale dragon obsession with abducting young maidens, but that’s about where the similarities end. Romanian’s folklorist Tudor Pamfile categorizes the Balauri into three distinct species: water dwelling, land dwelling, and air dwelling. Because the other two don’t fly, we can only assume the Solomonar dragon is of the air dwelling variety. It is however worth noting that the water dwellers apparently live in wells at the center of villages, which seems suspiciously similar to the small lake this dragon [in Dracula] occupies. Interestingly, the air dwelling Balaur is often conflated with the Slavic Ala or Hala, which in standard Serbian means something to the effect of ‘weather demon,’ and this matters because there’s actually a lot of information out there about these creatures, and if they’re conflated we can kind of learn something about the Balaur by proxy. For instance, [Ala] can control or at least influence the weather. When two of them fight, it manifests as a great storm powerful enough to uproot entire trees. In some stories they traverse the sky using rainbows as a pathway. In others, they suck moisture out of their surroundings in order to create the rain.
   But the Solomonar dragon is unique among them. A mere heavenward glance is enough to cause rainfall. It’s so large, if it were ever to land upon the ground it would consume a large portion of the Earth, which is why in the stories God prevents it from ever tiring during flight. Kind of sounds like we’re dealing with something on a Jormungandr world-serpent scale here, except it’s a dragon, which is objectively even more terrifying. That bottomless lake it lives in suddenly makes a lot of sense. Truly a mount worthy of the legendary Dracula… if he did indeed ever ride it!”
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Re: This deserves more discussion
#212: April 25, 2021, 03:03:27 PM
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   “… because there is a type of [red-haired] sorcerer in [Romanian] folklore called a ‘Solomonar,’ and it does fit [Emily] Gerard’s description [of the folklore behind Dracula’s alma mater]—[underground] school, devil, dragon and all. And even though there doesn’t seem to be much information about the school itself out there, we’ve got plenty about the Solomonarie who supposedly attended it. Probably the most relevant piece of information we have is the suggestion that they’re undead. [Romanian loremaster Simion Florea] Marian paints the Solomonarie as Strigoi, a kind of craven, evil, extremely malicious zombie. Essentially a Romanian proto-vampire with all the same abilities and weaknesses we’re used to—the bloodsucking, the transformation, the aversion to garlic and holy symbols and sunlight, the super strength, the stake to the heart—but without all the sexy, shiny Victorian-ness of our modern concept.
   Even so, Strigoi or not, you might not actually even realize it if you ran into a Solomonar. They blend in almost perfectly with the locals, taller than most maybe, with a mane of red hair. But they wear the same clothes as the peasantry and go around begging for alms. Not exactly typical vampire behavior. This is how they keep an eye on the populace—see whose land deserves the attention of the [underground] school’s weather maker. Some versions of the legend even suggest that any Solomonar can mount the dragon and guide the storms, and that if you can just find one of them, you can pay them to bring bad weather to your enemies. You can even hire a counter-Solomonar pre-emptively to keep someone from doing this to you. In a pinch, if you really need to identify one of them, take a look in their bag. They’ll be carrying around a Birch bark saddle, a branch that was used to kill a snake, and most telling of all, a Solomonar’s book: the place where they record all the spells and charms they learned during their time in the school.
   So we have a bunch of vagrant, red-haired vampire-wizards wandering around making a show of begging in order to figure out who deserves a thunderstorm, so that their dragon-riding friend can bring it to them. Maybe not the image Stoker had in mind for Dracula, but that’s okay, good even. It can be our image, a fresh take full of new material. This could be a Dracula, or a point in Dracula’s story, that few people have ever even thought to spend time on. And this, mind you, is before we even discuss the Dragon!
   Marian distinguishes it from all the many different breeds of Slavic dragon in the region, suggesting it is specifically a Romanian Balaur (which honestly hardly narrows things down.) Yes, there are some shared qualities between Balauri: they often have golden scales, almost always have between three and twelve heads, and they maintain the typical fairytale dragon obsession with abducting young maidens, but that’s about where the similarities end. Romanian’s folklorist Tudor Pamfile categorizes the Balauri into three distinct species: water dwelling, land dwelling, and air dwelling. Because the other two don’t fly, we can only assume the Solomonar dragon is of the air dwelling variety. It is however worth noting that the water dwellers apparently live in wells at the center of villages, which seems suspiciously similar to the small lake this dragon [in Dracula] occupies. Interestingly, the air dwelling Balaur is often conflated with the Slavic Ala or Hala, which in standard Serbian means something to the effect of ‘weather demon,’ and this matters because there’s actually a lot of information out there about these creatures, and if they’re conflated we can kind of learn something about the Balaur by proxy. For instance, [Ala] can control or at least influence the weather. When two of them fight, it manifests as a great storm powerful enough to uproot entire trees. In some stories they traverse the sky using rainbows as a pathway. In others, they suck moisture out of their surroundings in order to create the rain.
   But the Solomonar dragon is unique among them. A mere heavenward glance is enough to cause rainfall. It’s so large, if it were ever to land upon the ground it would consume a large portion of the Earth, which is why in the stories God prevents it from ever tiring during flight. Kind of sounds like we’re dealing with something on a Jormungandr world-serpent scale here, except it’s a dragon, which is objectively even more terrifying. That bottomless lake it lives in suddenly makes a lot of sense. Truly a mount worthy of the legendary Dracula… if he did indeed ever ride it!”


Who else had red hair and came from that part of the world?
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Re: This deserves more discussion
#213: April 25, 2021, 03:44:18 PM
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Who else had red hair and came from that part of the world?

I've no red hair and my genes pop out more dwarfs than anything else lol, but now I'm curious.
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Re: This deserves more discussion
#214: April 25, 2021, 05:25:13 PM
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Quote
   “… because there is a type of [red-haired] sorcerer in [Romanian] folklore called a ‘Solomonar,’ and it does fit [Emily] Gerard’s description [of the folklore behind Dracula’s alma mater]—[underground] school, devil, dragon and all. And even though there doesn’t seem to be much information about the school itself out there, we’ve got plenty about the Solomonarie who supposedly attended it. Probably the most relevant piece of information we have is the suggestion that they’re undead. [Romanian loremaster Simion Florea] Marian paints the Solomonarie as Strigoi, a kind of craven, evil, extremely malicious zombie. Essentially a Romanian proto-vampire with all the same abilities and weaknesses we’re used to—the bloodsucking, the transformation, the aversion to garlic and holy symbols and sunlight, the super strength, the stake to the heart—but without all the sexy, shiny Victorian-ness of our modern concept.
   Even so, Strigoi or not, you might not actually even realize it if you ran into a Solomonar. They blend in almost perfectly with the locals, taller than most maybe, with a mane of red hair. But they wear the same clothes as the peasantry and go around begging for alms. Not exactly typical vampire behavior. This is how they keep an eye on the populace—see whose land deserves the attention of the [underground] school’s weather maker. Some versions of the legend even suggest that any Solomonar can mount the dragon and guide the storms, and that if you can just find one of them, you can pay them to bring bad weather to your enemies. You can even hire a counter-Solomonar pre-emptively to keep someone from doing this to you. In a pinch, if you really need to identify one of them, take a look in their bag. They’ll be carrying around a Birch bark saddle, a branch that was used to kill a snake, and most telling of all, a Solomonar’s book: the place where they record all the spells and charms they learned during their time in the school.
   So we have a bunch of vagrant, red-haired vampire-wizards wandering around making a show of begging in order to figure out who deserves a thunderstorm, so that their dragon-riding friend can bring it to them. Maybe not the image Stoker had in mind for Dracula, but that’s okay, good even. It can be our image, a fresh take full of new material. This could be a Dracula, or a point in Dracula’s story, that few people have ever even thought to spend time on. And this, mind you, is before we even discuss the Dragon!
   Marian distinguishes it from all the many different breeds of Slavic dragon in the region, suggesting it is specifically a Romanian Balaur (which honestly hardly narrows things down.) Yes, there are some shared qualities between Balauri: they often have golden scales, almost always have between three and twelve heads, and they maintain the typical fairytale dragon obsession with abducting young maidens, but that’s about where the similarities end. Romanian’s folklorist Tudor Pamfile categorizes the Balauri into three distinct species: water dwelling, land dwelling, and air dwelling. Because the other two don’t fly, we can only assume the Solomonar dragon is of the air dwelling variety. It is however worth noting that the water dwellers apparently live in wells at the center of villages, which seems suspiciously similar to the small lake this dragon [in Dracula] occupies. Interestingly, the air dwelling Balaur is often conflated with the Slavic Ala or Hala, which in standard Serbian means something to the effect of ‘weather demon,’ and this matters because there’s actually a lot of information out there about these creatures, and if they’re conflated we can kind of learn something about the Balaur by proxy. For instance, [Ala] can control or at least influence the weather. When two of them fight, it manifests as a great storm powerful enough to uproot entire trees. In some stories they traverse the sky using rainbows as a pathway. In others, they suck moisture out of their surroundings in order to create the rain.
   But the Solomonar dragon is unique among them. A mere heavenward glance is enough to cause rainfall. It’s so large, if it were ever to land upon the ground it would consume a large portion of the Earth, which is why in the stories God prevents it from ever tiring during flight. Kind of sounds like we’re dealing with something on a Jormungandr world-serpent scale here, except it’s a dragon, which is objectively even more terrifying. That bottomless lake it lives in suddenly makes a lot of sense. Truly a mount worthy of the legendary Dracula… if he did indeed ever ride it!”


Who else had red hair and came from that part of the world?

With a penchant for cruelty and making horrific examples of their victims
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Re: This deserves more discussion
#215: April 26, 2021, 01:12:39 AM
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Quote
   “… because there is a type of [red-haired] sorcerer in [Romanian] folklore called a ‘Solomonar,’ and it does fit [Emily] Gerard’s description [of the folklore behind Dracula’s alma mater]—[underground] school, devil, dragon and all. And even though there doesn’t seem to be much information about the school itself out there, we’ve got plenty about the Solomonarie who supposedly attended it. Probably the most relevant piece of information we have is the suggestion that they’re undead. [Romanian loremaster Simion Florea] Marian paints the Solomonarie as Strigoi, a kind of craven, evil, extremely malicious zombie. Essentially a Romanian proto-vampire with all the same abilities and weaknesses we’re used to—the bloodsucking, the transformation, the aversion to garlic and holy symbols and sunlight, the super strength, the stake to the heart—but without all the sexy, shiny Victorian-ness of our modern concept.
   Even so, Strigoi or not, you might not actually even realize it if you ran into a Solomonar. They blend in almost perfectly with the locals, taller than most maybe, with a mane of red hair. But they wear the same clothes as the peasantry and go around begging for alms. Not exactly typical vampire behavior. This is how they keep an eye on the populace—see whose land deserves the attention of the [underground] school’s weather maker. Some versions of the legend even suggest that any Solomonar can mount the dragon and guide the storms, and that if you can just find one of them, you can pay them to bring bad weather to your enemies. You can even hire a counter-Solomonar pre-emptively to keep someone from doing this to you. In a pinch, if you really need to identify one of them, take a look in their bag. They’ll be carrying around a Birch bark saddle, a branch that was used to kill a snake, and most telling of all, a Solomonar’s book: the place where they record all the spells and charms they learned during their time in the school.
   So we have a bunch of vagrant, red-haired vampire-wizards wandering around making a show of begging in order to figure out who deserves a thunderstorm, so that their dragon-riding friend can bring it to them. Maybe not the image Stoker had in mind for Dracula, but that’s okay, good even. It can be our image, a fresh take full of new material. This could be a Dracula, or a point in Dracula’s story, that few people have ever even thought to spend time on. And this, mind you, is before we even discuss the Dragon!
   Marian distinguishes it from all the many different breeds of Slavic dragon in the region, suggesting it is specifically a Romanian Balaur (which honestly hardly narrows things down.) Yes, there are some shared qualities between Balauri: they often have golden scales, almost always have between three and twelve heads, and they maintain the typical fairytale dragon obsession with abducting young maidens, but that’s about where the similarities end. Romanian’s folklorist Tudor Pamfile categorizes the Balauri into three distinct species: water dwelling, land dwelling, and air dwelling. Because the other two don’t fly, we can only assume the Solomonar dragon is of the air dwelling variety. It is however worth noting that the water dwellers apparently live in wells at the center of villages, which seems suspiciously similar to the small lake this dragon [in Dracula] occupies. Interestingly, the air dwelling Balaur is often conflated with the Slavic Ala or Hala, which in standard Serbian means something to the effect of ‘weather demon,’ and this matters because there’s actually a lot of information out there about these creatures, and if they’re conflated we can kind of learn something about the Balaur by proxy. For instance, [Ala] can control or at least influence the weather. When two of them fight, it manifests as a great storm powerful enough to uproot entire trees. In some stories they traverse the sky using rainbows as a pathway. In others, they suck moisture out of their surroundings in order to create the rain.
   But the Solomonar dragon is unique among them. A mere heavenward glance is enough to cause rainfall. It’s so large, if it were ever to land upon the ground it would consume a large portion of the Earth, which is why in the stories God prevents it from ever tiring during flight. Kind of sounds like we’re dealing with something on a Jormungandr world-serpent scale here, except it’s a dragon, which is objectively even more terrifying. That bottomless lake it lives in suddenly makes a lot of sense. Truly a mount worthy of the legendary Dracula… if he did indeed ever ride it!”


Who else had red hair and came from that part of the world?

With a penchant for cruelty and making horrific examples of their victims


And a reputation for blood consumption.
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Re: This deserves more discussion
#216: April 26, 2021, 01:27:13 AM
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Quote
   “… because there is a type of [red-haired] sorcerer in [Romanian] folklore called a ‘Solomonar,’ and it does fit [Emily] Gerard’s description [of the folklore behind Dracula’s alma mater]—[underground] school, devil, dragon and all. And even though there doesn’t seem to be much information about the school itself out there, we’ve got plenty about the Solomonarie who supposedly attended it. Probably the most relevant piece of information we have is the suggestion that they’re undead. [Romanian loremaster Simion Florea] Marian paints the Solomonarie as Strigoi, a kind of craven, evil, extremely malicious zombie. Essentially a Romanian proto-vampire with all the same abilities and weaknesses we’re used to—the bloodsucking, the transformation, the aversion to garlic and holy symbols and sunlight, the super strength, the stake to the heart—but without all the sexy, shiny Victorian-ness of our modern concept.
   Even so, Strigoi or not, you might not actually even realize it if you ran into a Solomonar. They blend in almost perfectly with the locals, taller than most maybe, with a mane of red hair. But they wear the same clothes as the peasantry and go around begging for alms. Not exactly typical vampire behavior. This is how they keep an eye on the populace—see whose land deserves the attention of the [underground] school’s weather maker. Some versions of the legend even suggest that any Solomonar can mount the dragon and guide the storms, and that if you can just find one of them, you can pay them to bring bad weather to your enemies. You can even hire a counter-Solomonar pre-emptively to keep someone from doing this to you. In a pinch, if you really need to identify one of them, take a look in their bag. They’ll be carrying around a Birch bark saddle, a branch that was used to kill a snake, and most telling of all, a Solomonar’s book: the place where they record all the spells and charms they learned during their time in the school.
   So we have a bunch of vagrant, red-haired vampire-wizards wandering around making a show of begging in order to figure out who deserves a thunderstorm, so that their dragon-riding friend can bring it to them. Maybe not the image Stoker had in mind for Dracula, but that’s okay, good even. It can be our image, a fresh take full of new material. This could be a Dracula, or a point in Dracula’s story, that few people have ever even thought to spend time on. And this, mind you, is before we even discuss the Dragon!
   Marian distinguishes it from all the many different breeds of Slavic dragon in the region, suggesting it is specifically a Romanian Balaur (which honestly hardly narrows things down.) Yes, there are some shared qualities between Balauri: they often have golden scales, almost always have between three and twelve heads, and they maintain the typical fairytale dragon obsession with abducting young maidens, but that’s about where the similarities end. Romanian’s folklorist Tudor Pamfile categorizes the Balauri into three distinct species: water dwelling, land dwelling, and air dwelling. Because the other two don’t fly, we can only assume the Solomonar dragon is of the air dwelling variety. It is however worth noting that the water dwellers apparently live in wells at the center of villages, which seems suspiciously similar to the small lake this dragon [in Dracula] occupies. Interestingly, the air dwelling Balaur is often conflated with the Slavic Ala or Hala, which in standard Serbian means something to the effect of ‘weather demon,’ and this matters because there’s actually a lot of information out there about these creatures, and if they’re conflated we can kind of learn something about the Balaur by proxy. For instance, [Ala] can control or at least influence the weather. When two of them fight, it manifests as a great storm powerful enough to uproot entire trees. In some stories they traverse the sky using rainbows as a pathway. In others, they suck moisture out of their surroundings in order to create the rain.
   But the Solomonar dragon is unique among them. A mere heavenward glance is enough to cause rainfall. It’s so large, if it were ever to land upon the ground it would consume a large portion of the Earth, which is why in the stories God prevents it from ever tiring during flight. Kind of sounds like we’re dealing with something on a Jormungandr world-serpent scale here, except it’s a dragon, which is objectively even more terrifying. That bottomless lake it lives in suddenly makes a lot of sense. Truly a mount worthy of the legendary Dracula… if he did indeed ever ride it!”


Who else had red hair and came from that part of the world?

With a penchant for cruelty and making horrific examples of their victims


And a reputation for blood consumption.
Vlad "the Impaler" Dracul.

Edit: scratch that, I could've sworn I remembered him as being red-haired, but google images just shows him with black/dark brown hair.
And the other 'vampire' like figure from that area, Elizabeth Batory, also didn't have red hair. So I do not know, but please enligthen us any that do :)
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Re: This deserves more discussion
#217: April 26, 2021, 11:19:54 AM
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Vlad "the Impaler" Dracul.

If etymology hints true, they also took their spear magic to Ireland.
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This deserves more discussion
#218: April 26, 2021, 04:07:02 PM
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Found this today with no context. Someone said (on twitter) it's the giant from kandahar afghanistan.
No contest a Spear Chucker v SAWs -Squad Automatic Weapons . Sixes

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Re: This deserves more discussion
#219: April 26, 2021, 10:32:12 PM
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Quote
   “… because there is a type of [red-haired] sorcerer in [Romanian] folklore called a ‘Solomonar,’ and it does fit [Emily] Gerard’s description [of the folklore behind Dracula’s alma mater]—[underground] school, devil, dragon and all. And even though there doesn’t seem to be much information about the school itself out there, we’ve got plenty about the Solomonarie who supposedly attended it. Probably the most relevant piece of information we have is the suggestion that they’re undead. [Romanian loremaster Simion Florea] Marian paints the Solomonarie as Strigoi, a kind of craven, evil, extremely malicious zombie. Essentially a Romanian proto-vampire with all the same abilities and weaknesses we’re used to—the bloodsucking, the transformation, the aversion to garlic and holy symbols and sunlight, the super strength, the stake to the heart—but without all the sexy, shiny Victorian-ness of our modern concept.
   Even so, Strigoi or not, you might not actually even realize it if you ran into a Solomonar. They blend in almost perfectly with the locals, taller than most maybe, with a mane of red hair. But they wear the same clothes as the peasantry and go around begging for alms. Not exactly typical vampire behavior. This is how they keep an eye on the populace—see whose land deserves the attention of the [underground] school’s weather maker. Some versions of the legend even suggest that any Solomonar can mount the dragon and guide the storms, and that if you can just find one of them, you can pay them to bring bad weather to your enemies. You can even hire a counter-Solomonar pre-emptively to keep someone from doing this to you. In a pinch, if you really need to identify one of them, take a look in their bag. They’ll be carrying around a Birch bark saddle, a branch that was used to kill a snake, and most telling of all, a Solomonar’s book: the place where they record all the spells and charms they learned during their time in the school.
   So we have a bunch of vagrant, red-haired vampire-wizards wandering around making a show of begging in order to figure out who deserves a thunderstorm, so that their dragon-riding friend can bring it to them. Maybe not the image Stoker had in mind for Dracula, but that’s okay, good even. It can be our image, a fresh take full of new material. This could be a Dracula, or a point in Dracula’s story, that few people have ever even thought to spend time on. And this, mind you, is before we even discuss the Dragon!
   Marian distinguishes it from all the many different breeds of Slavic dragon in the region, suggesting it is specifically a Romanian Balaur (which honestly hardly narrows things down.) Yes, there are some shared qualities between Balauri: they often have golden scales, almost always have between three and twelve heads, and they maintain the typical fairytale dragon obsession with abducting young maidens, but that’s about where the similarities end. Romanian’s folklorist Tudor Pamfile categorizes the Balauri into three distinct species: water dwelling, land dwelling, and air dwelling. Because the other two don’t fly, we can only assume the Solomonar dragon is of the air dwelling variety. It is however worth noting that the water dwellers apparently live in wells at the center of villages, which seems suspiciously similar to the small lake this dragon [in Dracula] occupies. Interestingly, the air dwelling Balaur is often conflated with the Slavic Ala or Hala, which in standard Serbian means something to the effect of ‘weather demon,’ and this matters because there’s actually a lot of information out there about these creatures, and if they’re conflated we can kind of learn something about the Balaur by proxy. For instance, [Ala] can control or at least influence the weather. When two of them fight, it manifests as a great storm powerful enough to uproot entire trees. In some stories they traverse the sky using rainbows as a pathway. In others, they suck moisture out of their surroundings in order to create the rain.
   But the Solomonar dragon is unique among them. A mere heavenward glance is enough to cause rainfall. It’s so large, if it were ever to land upon the ground it would consume a large portion of the Earth, which is why in the stories God prevents it from ever tiring during flight. Kind of sounds like we’re dealing with something on a Jormungandr world-serpent scale here, except it’s a dragon, which is objectively even more terrifying. That bottomless lake it lives in suddenly makes a lot of sense. Truly a mount worthy of the legendary Dracula… if he did indeed ever ride it!”


Who else had red hair and came from that part of the world?

With a penchant for cruelty and making horrific examples of their victims


And a reputation for blood consumption.
Vlad "the Impaler" Dracul.

Edit: scratch that, I could've sworn I remembered him as being red-haired, but google images just shows him with black/dark brown hair.
And the other 'vampire' like figure from that area, Elizabeth Batory, also didn't have red hair. So I do not know, but please enligthen us any that do :)


The 13th tribe.
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Re: This deserves more discussion
#220: April 27, 2021, 10:03:20 AM
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The 13th tribe.
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Red hair is also found amongst the Ashkenazi Jewish populations.[13] In 1903, 5.6% of Polish Jews had red hair.[14] Other studies have found that 3.69% of Jewish women overall were found to have red hair, but around 10.9% of all Jewish men have red beards.[15] In European culture, before the 20th century, red hair was often seen as a stereotypically Jewish trait: during the Spanish Inquisition, all those with red hair were identified as Jewish.[16] In Italy, red hair was associated with Italian Jews, and Judas was traditionally depicted as red-haired in Italian and Spanish art.[17] The stereotype that red hair is Jewish remains in parts of Eastern Europe and Russia.

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During the Spanish Inquisition, people of red hair were identified as Jewish and isolated for persecution.[16] In Medieval Italy and Spain, red hair was associated with the heretical nature of Jews and their rejection of Jesus, and thus Judas Iscariot was commonly depicted as red-haired in Italian and Spanish art.[17] Writers from Shakespeare to Dickens would identify Jewish characters by giving them red hair, such as the villainous Jewish characters Shylock and Fagin.[77] The antisemitic association persisted into modern times in Soviet Russia.[18] The medieval prejudice against red-hair may have derived from the Ancient biblical tradition, in relation to biblical figures such as Esau and King David. The Ancient historian Josephus would mistranslate the Hebrew Torah to describe the more positive figure of King David as 'golden haired', in contrast to the negative figure of Esau, even though the original Hebrew Torah implies that both King David and Esau had 'fiery red hair'.[78]
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Re: This deserves more discussion
#221: April 27, 2021, 11:18:21 AM
“A Scythian drinks of the blood of the first man whom he has overthrown. He carries to his king the heads of all whom he has slain.”
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Re: This deserves more discussion
#222: April 27, 2021, 04:01:23 PM
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“A Scythian drinks of the blood of the first man whom he has overthrown. He carries to his king the heads of all whom he has slain.”

Now those were some bad ass dudes EPHEMERON. Wasn't there a flick 8 heads in a dufflebag?Art imitating life . Sixes
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Re: This deserves more discussion
#223: May 05, 2021, 02:25:41 AM
Did anyone mention the Amalek yet?
This explains, it appears, why "Jews" hate red hairs.

Also, I'd like to again ask Nick on behalf of whoever did it before, thinking Dimensions, if blue eyes are indicative of anything in particular.
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Re: This deserves more discussion
#224: May 05, 2021, 02:55:37 AM
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Did anyone mention the Amalek yet?
This explains, it appears, why "Jews" hate red hairs.

Also, I'd like to again ask Nick on behalf of whoever did it before, thinking Dimensions, if blue eyes are indicative of anything in particular.

Recessive genetics. I've answered this before
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